Author Topic: Molyneux on the poor  (Read 360 times)

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Lupus

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Molyneux on the poor
« on: May 20, 2018, 08:21:23 PM »
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A great quote from the millionaire Youtube "philosopher" Stefan Molyneux on the poor, says pretty much everything you need to know about his misanthropy . . .

From The Truth About Critical Cycles in Human History / Youtube. 42:39

"You don't want to get involved with the poor, because, you know, they can be loud, they can be smelly, they can be crazy a lot of times, and they can be manipulative, right, because if you want to feel sorry for the poor that's fine, there are certainly poor people to be sorry for, but I grew up in poverty, a lot of those people were just jerks, they were just mean, they were selfish, they were dysfunctional, they didn't address their issues, they had weird addictions that they didn't want to confront, and they had the Dunning Kruger effect of just like not knowing a god damn thing in the universe but thinking they knew everything, there was you know . . . and so this arrogance that comes from stupidity was all over the place . . . "

His misanthropy aside, he seems to jump between having a private school education, 10 years of violin lessons, regular International travel as a child (and so on) . . . and growing up in 'poverty' . . . as someone with a similar background to Molyneux (age, location), it's preposterous for him to claim poverty while attending a private boarding school (from the age of 6) and visiting his father in South Africa during the summers, in the UK, in the 70s (when Molynuex would have been a school aged child) private schooling was synonoumous with wealth, in the same way that these days we might use the image of a private jet as a placeholder for wealth, private schooling was literally that expensive back then (less so these days), only the very very well off had their children attend private boarding school, and international travel in the 70s was prohibitively expensive for most people, and well out of the reach of the average working class family.

So it makes me grin whenever he promulgates his 'I grew up in poverty' nonsense' . . . but back to my point, his views on the 'smelly' and 'loud' poor says so much about Molyneux in 2018.




money detonator

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2018, 10:08:36 AM »
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Lupus, don't forget about how he had a nanny!  LOL   ;D

In one of his podcasts with Milo as his guest, Molyneux claimed he grew up on an English Estate, with proper Christian adults supervising and guiding him, shaping him into the embodiment of Western Christian virtues. ::)

Contrast that with his prior years of daily complaining about being abandoned, neglected, abused, beaten by a psycho shamelessly promiscuous single mom, living in the projects, too poor even to have food to eat or heat, a childhood so depraved that it pushed him into juvenile delinquency, stealing bikes, shoplifting, and trying to cash stolen checks. 
« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 02:44:24 PM by money detonator »
"They are just money detonators!"  - Stefan Molyneux, passive-aggressive parenting expert, describes his wife and child as worse than taxation, podcast 2650

summa logicae

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2018, 12:20:18 PM »
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A great quote from the millionaire Youtube "philosopher" Stefan Molyneux on the poor, says pretty much everything you need to know about his misanthropy . . .

From The Truth About Critical Cycles in Human History / Youtube. 42:39

"You don't want to get involved with the poor, because, you know, they can be loud, they can be smelly, they can be crazy a lot of times, and they can be manipulative, right, because if you want to feel sorry for the poor that's fine, there are certainly poor people to be sorry for, but I grew up in poverty, a lot of those people were just jerks, they were just mean, they were selfish, they were dysfunctional, they didn't address their issues, they had weird addictions that they didn't want to confront, and they had the Dunning Kruger effect of just like not knowing a god damn thing in the universe but thinking they knew everything, there was you know . . . and so this arrogance that comes from stupidity was all over the place . . . "

His misanthropy aside, he seems to jump between having a private school education, 10 years of violin lessons, regular International travel as a child (and so on) . . . and growing up in 'poverty' . . . as someone with a similar background to Molyneux (age, location), it's preposterous for him to claim poverty while attending a private boarding school (from the age of 6) and visiting his father in South Africa during the summers, in the UK, in the 70s (when Molynuex would have been a school aged child) private schooling was synonoumous with wealth, in the same way that these days we might use the image of a private jet as a placeholder for wealth, private schooling was literally that expensive back then (less so these days), only the very very well off had their children attend private boarding school, and international travel in the 70s was prohibitively expensive for most people, and well out of the reach of the average working class family.

So it makes me grin whenever he promulgates his 'I grew up in poverty' nonsense' . . . but back to my point, his views on the 'smelly' and 'loud' poor says so much about Molyneux in 2018.

 Classic sublime analysis from the great modern Socrates. I had to laugh when he started talking about the poor that way, as, per usual, he made statements concerning his own supposed experience with certain people, leaving his audience to infer that all poor people are that way. It's impossible to know precisely in what conditions he grew up in because he's made several conflicting descriptions. I'm betting he grew up in relative comfort of the higher middle class variety.

Lupus

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 06:21:32 PM »
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Lupus, don't forget about how he had a nanny!  LOL   ;D

Good grief ! ;D Yes, I always forget about that, it's absolutely preposterous for him to claim hardship, I don't doubt that like pretty much any other family they had their difficult times, but once you have access to international travel (in the early 70s!) and private boarding school education (in the early 70s - in the UK !) and water polo lessons, and a nanny, and violin lessons . . . etc etc . . . then claiming poverty is the stuff of fantasy.

He once interviewed Tommy Robinson (ex-EDL), and towards the start of the interview he tried to suggest they had strikingly similar upbringings, that they came from the same background, lol, I literally laughed out loud, Molyneux's output can often be unintentionally funny, this was one occasion that really put a grin on my face, here you have someone with a genuinely working-class background (UK 'working class' - so US = low-skilled manual labour, basically poor) born to Irish immigrant parents who worked at the local car plant . . . and then you have Molyneux attending private boarding school from the age of 6 and summering in South Africa with his father, I would guess Robinson spent his summers kicking a deflated football around a local carpark or trying to cut the lock off a bike (like we all did, lol) . . .


Lupus

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2018, 06:35:51 PM »
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Classic sublime analysis from the great modern Socrates.

You can't really compare Molyneux to Socrates, Molyneux has over 750k subscribers, Socrates has zero subscribers, and Molyneux invented "philosophy" and entrepreneurship and America and virtue, so he is the winner.

I had to laugh when he started talking about the poor that way, as, per usual, he made statements concerning his own supposed experience with certain people, leaving his audience to infer that all poor people are that way.

Yep, he seems to constantly fall into this trap, extrapolating his personal experience to everyone and everything, his hatred for women, for the poor, for Hollywood and for the state, his hatred for good looking people and education and his hatred for publishers . . . (etc etc) . . . all seemingly the result of his personal experience, the day his book gets rejected by a publisher is the day the publishing industry as a whole becomes a corrupt, venal, conspiratorial, and ultimately evil, enterprise.

It's impossible to know precisely in what conditions he grew up in because he's made several conflicting descriptions. I'm betting he grew up in relative comfort of the higher middle class variety.

Who knows, like you say he's so inconsistent it's impossible to do anything but guess.

summa logicae

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2018, 01:01:27 PM »
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"You can't really compare Molyneux to Socrates, Molyneux has over 750k subscribers, Socrates has zero subscribers, and Molyneux invented "philosophy" and entrepreneurship and America and virtue, so he is the winner."

Right, I forgot about Molyneux's subscribers. Against that, no ancient Greek can stand.


money detonator

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2018, 11:33:14 AM »
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If being poor really held such a stigma, he'd never even admit to having been poor, or try to portray himself that way, even if it wasn't true.  Obviously, back then, he was hoping to sound pitiful so he'd get more and bigger donations.

This shaming act is part of his scam of framing himself as a savior.  Notice, his audience are often not doing well financially, and aren't happy about it.  They are probably scared of being or becoming poor, and being despised by society for it.

He used the same setup in his early days, shaming those who had been traumatized as children by abuse ... depicting them as the source of evil in the world - and future child abusers.  Simultaneously, he sought to convince his entire audience that they (as well as everyone) suffered from this problem, and that he was their only salvation for avoiding their awful fate of becoming evil.

With Molyneux, it is hard to figure out whether his misanthropy and hatred of every definable unpopular group du jour is more of a money making strategy than genuine (also hard to tell if anything about him is real).  The only thing I am sure of is that to do what he's been doing for all these years, esp. what he does to his followers, requires his contempt and disregard for everyone but himself.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 12:00:18 PM by money detonator »
"They are just money detonators!"  - Stefan Molyneux, passive-aggressive parenting expert, describes his wife and child as worse than taxation, podcast 2650

Faith

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Re: Molyneux on the poor
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2018, 12:10:04 PM »
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Amazing that Molyneux contradicts himself so often- claiming in one video he grew up.in poverty and then claiming he had a privileged upbringing in another video. Bizarre!
I think this is somewhat common with narcissists - they seem to have difficulty separating fantasy and reality, and often have trouble remembering their childhoods.

Whatever happened to him as a child, I'm sure it wasn't good. He must have suffered some type of abuse,  (which he never dealt with,) causing Stefan to become the extremely controlling narcissist that he is today.