Author Topic: Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?  (Read 195 times)

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Oliver Cromwell

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Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?
« on: September 20, 2018, 04:49:11 PM »
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https://youtu.be/n9XKlxoqFqQ

Moylneux isn't a philosopher. He's a poor man's Jerry Springer, or Oprah minus empathy.

summa logicae

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Re: Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2018, 07:59:44 PM »
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Socrates: "I only know that I know nothing."

Aristotle: "All men by nature desire knowledge."

Molyneux: "I'm a really smart guy."

The Observer

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Re: Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2018, 09:43:59 PM »
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Yes, and it got to the point where it was so depressing I stopped listening.  I have to question if the caller was real, but I think he was, unfortunately.  He sounded very disassociated.  :(

Oliver Cromwell

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Re: Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2018, 04:17:51 AM »
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Yes, and it got to the point where it was so depressing I stopped listening.  I have to question if the caller was real, but I think he was, unfortunately.  He sounded very disassociated.  :(

And being mocked into the comments for all to see...if only he had spared himself the public humiliation.

Lupus

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Re: Ladies and gentlemen, is this philosophy?
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 07:18:26 AM »
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Why does this sound familiar . . . ?


It ["Jerry Springer"] started as a politically oriented talk show, a longer version of Springer's commentaries. Guests included Oliver North and Jesse Jackson, and topics included homelessness and gun politics.

In early 1994, Springer and his new producer, Richard Dominick, revamped the show's format in order to garner higher ratings. The show became more successful as it became targeted toward tabloidish sensationalism. Guests were everyday people confronted on a television stage by a spouse or family member's adultery, homosexuality, prostitution, transvestism, hate group membership, or other controversial situations. These confrontations were often promoted by scripted shouting or violence on stage. The show received substantial ratings and much attention. By 1998, it was beating The Oprah Winfrey Show in many cities, and was reaching more than 6.7 million viewers.



. . . Jerry Springer, the world's biggest "Philosophy" show.