Author Topic: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?  (Read 1362 times)

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money detonator

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Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« on: November 30, 2019, 09:07:27 AM »
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Just wondering if he's resurfaced anywhere ... did he dig himself deeper and follow in the footsteps of Chris Cantwell, or is he on the road to recovery to a normal life?

Lupus

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2019, 03:28:59 PM »
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Just wondering if he's resurfaced anywhere ... did he dig himself deeper and follow in the footsteps of Chris Cantwell, or is he on the road to recovery to a normal life?

He seems to have pretty much disappeared.

money detonator

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2019, 02:12:17 PM »
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Just wondering if he's resurfaced anywhere ... did he dig himself deeper and follow in the footsteps of Chris Cantwell, or is he on the road to recovery to a normal life?

He seems to have pretty much disappeared.

If he went the way of Cantwell (Web and social media attention whore), I'm sure we would have heard from him by now.

Lupus

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2019, 08:08:07 PM »
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If he went the way of Cantwell (Web and social media attention whore), I'm sure we would have heard from him by now.

Absolutely, he would have popped up somewhere by now if he went that way, it's been around a year now and I've seen or heard absolutely nothing from or about him, I'm going to guess he's shunned the limelight and gone for a normal (not in alt media) type of job ?

money detonator

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2019, 11:11:05 AM »
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Well on the bright side, he's only wasted 12 years of the prime of his life believing he'd "save the world" with Molyneux.  Bad news is, he's wasted 12 years of the prime of his life enabling a fraud.

Maybe he will write a tell-all book!  That seems to be what everyone does these days.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2019, 07:04:53 PM by money detonator »

Lupus

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2019, 02:00:50 AM »
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Well on the bright side, he's only wasted 12 years of the prime of his life believing he'd "save the world" with Molyneux.  Bad news is, he's wasted 12 years of the prime of his life enabling a fraud.

It'd be very difficult to admit anything like that to yourself, let alone to others, I would guess he'd likely rationalize it in some sort of way . . . 'I did my part in saving the world'.

The thought of 'I wasted 12 years of my life' is up against some pretty grandiose notions . . . 'We tipped the scales in the 2016 US election' - 'we influenced Brexit' - 'we saved countless children from abuse' - 'we rescued philosophy' - "[this show] has influence in the very highest corridors of power in the world" . . . (etc etc)

I can't imagine he (or to be honest anyone) would find it easy to abandon these addictive self-aggrandising notions of power and importance (after so long in the echo chamber) and replace them  with 'I wasted 12 years peddaling bullshit'.

I can imagine Mike, in 20 years, working in some job somewhere, still boring colleagues with his stories of how he (thinks he) helped shape the political and social landscape in the early part of the 21st century.  ;D

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2019, 09:56:42 AM »
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Well on the bright side, he's only wasted 12 years of the prime of his life believing he'd "save the world" with Molyneux.  Bad news is, he's wasted 12 years of the prime of his life enabling a fraud.

It'd be very difficult to admit anything like that to yourself, let alone to others, I would guess he'd likely rationalize it in some sort of way . . . 'I did my part in saving the world'.

The thought of 'I wasted 12 years of my life' is up against some pretty grandiose notions . . . 'We tipped the scales in the 2016 US election' - 'we influenced Brexit' - 'we saved countless children from abuse' - 'we rescued philosophy' - "[this show] has influence in the very highest corridors of power in the world" . . . (etc etc)

I can't imagine he (or to be honest anyone) would find it easy to abandon these addictive self-aggrandising notions of power and importance (after so long in the echo chamber) and replace them  with 'I wasted 12 years peddaling bullshit'.

I can imagine Mike, in 20 years, working in some job somewhere, still boring colleagues with his stories of how he (thinks he) helped shape the political and social landscape in the early part of the 21st century.  ;D

Steven Hassan did it, as well as many others.  It is hardly impossible. A large part of how people get recruited into cults has to do with the willingness to lie to themselves, and allowing an exploitative person to be in control of the process.  Getting to the point of leaving likely means some of that has stopped working.  I think we all lie to ourselves about something or other.   It is extremely bad luck to come across a manipulative person that figures out how to take advantage of it.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 10:46:26 AM by money detonator »

Lupus

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2019, 11:44:47 AM »
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Steven Hassan did it, as well as many others.  It is hardly impossible.

Yes, agreed, it's not impossible, I just can't imagine - in this particular case - Mike readily giving up the mountain of self-aggrandizement built up over the years with the cold reality of "I helped out some narcissist/fantasist with his podcast"  ;D

A large part of how people get recruited into cults has to do with the willingness to lie to themselves, and allowing an exploitative person to be in control of the process.  Getting to the point of leaving likely means some of that has stopped working.  I think we all lie to ourselves about something or other.   It is extremely bad luck to come across a manipulative person that figures out how to take advantage of it.

I won't for a moment claim to know anything about the psychology of cults / victims of cults, or even be able to definitively say whether FDR ever was a bona fide cult, all I'd say is that Mike seemed to have been in a somewhat unique position, rather than being a straightforward / regular 'cult member' - let's say, as an example, someone encouraged to cut ties with their family, isolate themselves from friends who don't pass the cult leader's purity test (usually everyone), move closer to the cult, donate money to the cult . . . etc etc - he instead was Molyneux's right-hand man, someone directly involved in steering FDR in the direction it was going, if he can be said to have escaped a cult, he has in-part escaped his own cult.

In this regard he's not the typical victim, rather than throwing off someone else's ideas, he would be rejecting something he'd built himself, which I suspect is a much harder task.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 11:52:10 AM by Lupus »

money detonator

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2019, 12:28:53 PM »
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Steven Hassan did it, as well as many others.  It is hardly impossible.

Yes, agreed, it's not impossible, I just can't imagine - in this particular case - Mike readily giving up the mountain of self-aggrandizement built up over the years with the cold reality of "I helped out some narcissist/fantasist with his podcast"  ;D

A large part of how people get recruited into cults has to do with the willingness to lie to themselves, and allowing an exploitative person to be in control of the process.  Getting to the point of leaving likely means some of that has stopped working.  I think we all lie to ourselves about something or other.   It is extremely bad luck to come across a manipulative person that figures out how to take advantage of it.

I won't for a moment claim to know anything about the psychology of cults / victims of cults, or even be able to definitively say whether FDR ever was a bona fide cult, all I'd say is that Mike seemed to have been in a somewhat unique position, rather than being a straightforward / regular 'cult member' - let's say, as an example, someone encouraged to cut ties with their family, isolate themselves from friends who don't pass the cult leader's purity test (usually everyone), move closer to the cult, donate money to the cult . . . etc etc - he instead was Molyneux's right-hand man, someone directly involved in steering FDR in the direction it was going, if he can be said to have escaped a cult, he has in-part escaped his own cult.

In this regard he's not the typical victim, rather than throwing off someone else's ideas, he would be rejecting something he'd built himself, which I suspect is a much harder task.

Hassan was a top recruiter and a right hand man to Rev Moon, very involved in growing the organization.  People in upper levels of Scientology have written tell all books long after leaving.  Those people made the entire journey from total immersion and involvement to the point of being able to publicly criticize the group.  Mike doesn't not come across as the introspective type, unlike many of the earliest FDR listeners, which was likely why he stayed around so long.  Molyneux doesn't control his followers' place of residence, so his hold is not as complete as groups that require members to live together in specific places.  You are right though that most people walk away from such groups because they were dissatisfied by some aspect, but then do not bother to try to figure out what happened to them.

Many who leave high demand groups will join another or start their own using what they learned.  After all, Molyneux himself is one such person.  He left Landmark.  His main gripe was that they cost too much money.  He used the same recruitment methods to start FDR, where he could be the main financial beneficiary of his own recruitment efforts.

Its a reason why I am curious about which way Mike would go.  I think odds are that your guess is right.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 01:30:25 PM by money detonator »

Lupus

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Re: Any signs of Mike DeMarco?
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2019, 06:47:25 AM »
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Its a reason why I am curious about which way Mike would go.

I also think his history is going to be an issue when it comes to getting work outside of the very narrow confines of the 'alt-media' . . . in fact Molyneux (and by extension Mike) is not universally liked even within the alt-media, there are plenty of well known figures who are critical of him . . . so imagine a possible employer armed with little more than a browser digging up some of the more unsavoury stuff put out by FDR.