Author Topic: psychological Terrorism and Torture  (Read 54 times)

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Freedom of speach2

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psychological Terrorism and Torture
« on: January 13, 2020, 03:49:39 PM »
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Hello my name is Michael and I am also a victim but i choose to fight back and help others to do the same!! you know according to International Laws!! And it states that if cannot get justice in your own country then you have have the domestic crimes transferred to International Courts for trial!!
Access to justice in international courts for indigent states, persons and peoples
CONTROL COUNCIL
Law No. 10
PUNISHMENT OF PERSONS GUILTY OF WAR CRIMES, CRIMES AGAINST PEACE AND
AGAINST HUMANITY
In order to give effect to the terms of the Moscow Declaration of 30 October 1943 and the
London Agreement of 8 August 1945, and the Charter issued pursuant thereto and in order to
establish a uniform legal basis in Germany for the prosecution of war criminals and other
similar offenders, other than those dealt with by the International Military Tribunal, the Control
Council enacts as follows:
Article I
The Moscow Declaration of 30 October 1943 "Concerning Responsibility of Hitlerites for
Committed Atrocities" and the London Agreement of 8 August 1945 "Concerning Prosecution
and Punishment of Major War Criminals of European Axis" are made integral parts of this Law.
Adherence to the provisions of the London Agreement by any of the United Nations, as
provided for in Article V of that Agreement, shall not entitle such Nation to participate or
interfere in the operation of this Law within the Control Council area of authority in Germany.
Article II
1. Each of the following acts is recognized as a crime:
(a) Crimes against Peace. Initiation of invasions of other countries and wars of aggression in
violation of international laws and treaties, including but not limited to planning, preparation,
initiation or waging a war of aggression, or a war of violation of international treaties,
agreements or assurances, or participation in a common plan or conspiracy for the
accomplishment of any of the foregoing.
(b) War Crimes. Atrocities or offenses against persons or property constituting violations of the
laws or customs of war, including but not limited to, murder, ill treatment or deportation to
slave labour or for any other purpose, of civilian population from occupied territory, murder or
ill treatment of prisoners of war or persons on the seas, killing of hostages, plunder of public or
private property, wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages, or devastation not justified by
military necessity.
(a) Crimes against Humanity. Atrocities and offenses, including but not limited to murder,
extermination, enslavement, deportation, imprisonment, torture, rape, or other inhumane acts
PURL: https://www.legal-tools.org/doc/ffda62/
committed against any civilian population, or persecutions on political, racial or religious
grounds whether or not in violation of the domestic laws of the country where perpetrated.
(d) Membership in categories of a criminal group or organization declared criminal by the
International Military Tribunal.
2. Any person without regard to nationality or the capacity in which he acted, is deemed to
have committed a crime as defined in paragraph 1 of this Article, if he was (a) a principal or (b)
was an accessory to the commission of any such crime or ordered or abetted the same or (c)
took a consenting part therein or (d) was connected with plans or enterprises involving its
commission or (e) was a member of any organization or group connected with the commission
of any such crime or (f) with reference to paragraph 1 (a) if he held a high political, civil or
military (including General Staff) position in Germany or in one of its Allies, co-belligerents or
satellites or held high position in the financial, industrial or economic life of any such country.
3. Any persons found guilty of any of the crimes above mentioned may upon conviction be
punished as shall be determined by the tribunal to be just. Such punishment may consist of one
or more of the following:
(a) Death.
(b) Imprisonment for life or a term of years, with or without hard labor.
(c) Fine, and imprisonment with or without hard labour, in lieu thereof.
(d) Forfeiture of property.
(e) Restitution of property wrongfully acquired.
(f) Deprivation of some or all civil rights.
Any property declared to be forfeited or the restitution of which is ordered by the Tribunal shall
be delivered to the Control Council for Germany, which shall decide on its disposal.
4. (a) The official position of any person, whether as Head of State or as a responsible official in
a Government Department, does not free him from responsibility for a crime or entitle him to
mitigation of punishment.
(b) The fact that any person acted pursuant to the order of his Government or of a superior
does not free him from responsibility for a crime, but may be considered in mitigation.
5. In any trial or prosecution for a crime herein referred to, the accused shall not be entitled to
the benefits of any statute of limitation in respect to the period from 30 January 1933 to 1 July
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1945, nor shall any immunity, pardon or amnesty granted under the Nazi regime be admitted as
a bar to trial or punishment.
to view book click here https://www.amazon.com/Psychological-Terrorism-Discrimination-Harassment-Retaliation-ebook/dp/B01BTFXXOY/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=psychological+terrorism+michael+brown&qid=1578948895&sr=8-2

 War Crimes
Background

Ruins of Al-Uruba Hotel, Mogadishu
UN Photo/Tobin Jones
Even though the prohibition of certain behavior in the conduct of armed conflict can be traced back many centuries, the concept of war crimes developed particularly at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century, when international humanitarian law, also known as the law of armed conflict, was codified. The Hague Conventions adopted in 1899 and 1907 focus on the prohibition to warring parties to use certain means and methods of warfare. Several other related treaties have been adopted since then. In contrast, the Geneva Convention of 1864 and subsequent Geneva Conventions, notably the four 1949 Geneva Conventions and the two 1977 Additional Protocols, focus on the protection of persons not or no longer taking part in hostilities. Both Hague Law and Geneva Law identify several of the violations of its norms, though not all, as war crimes. However there is no one single document in international law that codifies all war crimes. Lists of war crimes can be found in both international humanitarian law and international criminal law treaties, as well as in international customary law.

The 1949 Geneva Conventions have been ratified by all Member States of the United Nations, while the Additional Protocols and other international humanitarian law treaties have not yet reached the same level of acceptance. However, many of the rules contained in these treaties have been considered as part of customary law and, as such, are binding on all States (and other parties to the conflict), whether or not States have ratified the treaties themselves. In addition, many rules of customary international law apply in both international and non-international armed conflict, expanding in this way the protection afforded in non-international armed conflicts, which are regulated only by common article 3 of the four Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocol II.

Definition
Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
Article 8
War Crimes

The Court shall have jurisdiction in respect of war crimes in particular when committed as part of a plan or policy or as part of a large-scale commission of such crimes.
For the purpose of this Statute, ‘war crimes’ means:
Grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely, any of the following acts against persons or property protected under the provisions of the relevant Geneva Convention:
Wilful killing
Torture or inhuman treatment, including biological experiments;
Wilfully causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or health;
Extensive destruction and appropriation of property, not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly;
Compelling a prisoner of war or other protected person to serve in the forces of a hostile Power;
Wilfully depriving a prisoner of war or other protected person of the rights of fair and regular trial;
Unlawful deportation or transfer or unlawful confinement;
Taking of hostages.
Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
Intentionally directing attacks against the civilian population as such or against individual civilians not taking direct part in hostilities;
Intentionally directing attacks against civilian objects, that is, objects which are not military objectives;
Intentionally directing attacks against personnel, installations, material, units or vehicles involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, as long as they are entitled to the protection given to civilians or civilian objects under the international law of armed conflict;
Intentionally launching an attack in the knowledge that such attack will cause incidental loss of life or injury to civilians or damage to civilian objects or widespread, long-term and severe damage to the natural environment which would be clearly excessive in relation to the concrete and direct overall military advantage anticipated;
Attacking or bombarding, by whatever means, towns, villages, dwellings or buildings which are undefended and which are not military objectives;
Killing or wounding a combatant who, having laid down his arms or having no longer means of defence, has surrendered at discretion;
Making improper use of a flag of truce, of the flag or of the military insignia and uniform of the enemy or of the United Nations, as well as of the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions, resulting in death or serious personal injury;
The transfer, directly or indirectly, by the Occupying Power of parts of its own civilian population into the territory it occupies, or the deportation or transfer of all or parts of the population of the occupied territory within or outside this territory;
Intentionally directing attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science or charitable purposes, historic monuments, hospitals and places where the sick and wounded are collected, provided they are not military objectives;
Subjecting persons who are in the power of an adverse party to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are neither justified by the medical, dental or hospital treatment of the person concerned nor carried out in his or her interest, and which cause death to or seriously endanger the health of such person or persons;
Killing or wounding treacherously individuals belonging to the hostile nation or army;
Declaring that no quarter will be given;
Destroying or seizing the enemy's property unless such destruction or seizure be imperatively demanded by the necessities of war;
Declaring abolished, suspended or inadmissible in a court of law the rights and actions of the nationals of the hostile party;
Compelling the nationals of the hostile party to take part in the operations of war directed against their own country, even if they were in the belligerent's service before the commencement of the war;
Pillaging a town or place, even when taken by assault;
Employing poison or poisoned weapons;
Employing asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and all analogous liquids, materials or devices;
Employing bullets which expand or flatten easily in the human body, such as bullets with a hard envelope which does not entirely cover the core or is pierced with incisions;
Employing weapons, projectiles and material and methods of warfare which are of a nature to cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering or which are inherently indiscriminate in violation of the international law of armed conflict, provided that such weapons, projectiles and material and methods of warfare are the subject of a comprehensive prohibition and are included in an annex to this Statute, by an amendment in accordance with the relevant provisions set forth in articles 121 and 123;
Committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment;
Committing rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, as defined in article 7, paragraph 2 (f), enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence also constituting a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions;
Utilizing the presence of a civilian or other protected person to render certain points, areas or military forces immune from military operations;
Intentionally directing attacks against buildings, material, medical units and transport, and personnel using the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions in conformity with international law;
Intentionally using starvation of civilians as a method of warfare by depriving them of objects indispensable to their survival, including wilfully impeding relief supplies as provided for under the Geneva Conventions;
Conscripting or enlisting children under the age of fifteen years into the national armed forces or using them to participate actively in hostilities.
In the case of an armed conflict not of an international character, serious violations of article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely, any of the following acts committed against persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause:
Violence to life and person, in particular murder of all kinds, mutilation, cruel treatment and torture;
Committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment;
Taking of hostages;
The passing of sentences and the carrying out of executions without previous judgement pronounced by a regularly constituted court, affording all judicial guarantees which are generally recognized as indispensable.
Paragraph 2 (c) applies to armed conflicts not of an international character and thus does not apply to situations of internal disturbances and tensions, such as riots, isolated and sporadic acts of violence or other acts of a similar nature.
Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in armed conflicts not of an international character, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
Intentionally directing attacks against the civilian population as such or against individual civilians not taking direct part in hostilities;
Intentionally directing attacks against buildings, material, medical units and transport, and personnel using the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions in conformity with international law;
Intentionally directing attacks against personnel, installations, material, units or vehicles involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, as long as they are entitled to the protection given to civilians or civilian objects under the international law of armed conflict;
Intentionally directing attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science or charitable purposes, historic monuments, hospitals and places where the sick and wounded are collected, provided they are not military objectives;
Pillaging a town or place, even when taken by assault;
Committing rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, as defined in article 7, paragraph 2 (f), enforced sterilization, and any other form of sexual violence also constituting a serious violation of article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions;
Conscripting or enlisting children under the age of fifteen years into armed forces or groups or using them to participate actively in hostilities;
Ordering the displacement of the civilian population for reasons related to the conflict, unless the security of the civilians involved or imperative military reasons so demand;
Killing or wounding treacherously a combatant adversary;
Declaring that no quarter will be given;
Subjecting persons who are in the power of another party to the conflict to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are neither justified by the medical, dental or hospital treatment of the person concerned nor carried out in his or her interest, and which cause death to or seriously endanger the health of such person or persons;
Destroying or seizing the property of an adversary unless such destruction or seizure be imperatively demanded by the necessities of the conflict;
« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 03:59:09 PM by Freedom of speach2 »