Goodbye, summer

Goodbye, my summer love. OK, your humble narrator didn’t have a summer love. (Technically, he has a love but she didn’t go away after the summer, for which he is grateful.)

But I did take a vacation from most things Molyneux to enjoy the summer and do other stuff. Frankly, the machinations of FreeDomain Radio got a little—how do I say this?—boring. So I took a break.

At first I asked myself, “But what about your responsibility to your readers?” And then I remembered that would be mostly me and mom. So off I went.

Now, where did I leave off? Oh, yes…

What’s it all about, Q.E? As I’m starting to add more stuff to the site, I thought it would be nice to remind newcomers about the point of FDR Liberated.

If you read my bio, you know that this more or less started as a writing project. One thing I’ve already learned about writing projects is they tend to take on a life of their own. I don’t know if I was fully aware of this a year or two ago, but FDR Liberated seems to be about three things:

  • An acknowledgement of Stefan Molyneux’s actual contributions as a teacher and his brilliance as a guide into libertarianism. I may not always agree with his points in economics/politics (for example, I think I’ve shown that his “Against Me” argument is useless), but he is always worth a listen. I have learned a great deal from him.
  • On the opposite end of that scale, this site often demonstrates that people who make a psychological investment in FDR may be doing so at grave risk. Because of (1) the reason FDR was founded, (2) the beliefs of the founder, and (3) the psychological techniques used on newcomers, I believe it can be a dangerous place to seek family/relationship advice. (All covered in the articles listed as “The 3 Foundations of FDR” in the upper left-hand corner of this page.)

    I’m not the only one who suspects this, but this argument often descends into emotional rhetoric whenever it comes up. As an alternative, I try to remain dispassionate and simply quote Molyneux extensively in an attempt to illustrate this view.
  • Finally, I find the personality/idiosyncracies of Molyneux himself and the FDR community in general to be endlessly fascinating. I like to discuss them, especially when they play a role in bullet #2 above.

And that’s pretty much what you find here. I try to be as painstaking and accurate in my research as possible and try to keep my language unclouded with emotion. (The exception is Quickies!, which can get snarky just for the fun of it.)

That’s the whole deal, more or less.